ogilvy-melted

We have a popular saying in Portuguese that can be translated into something like: you don’t change a winning team (“em equipa vencedora não se mexe”). That is, unless, of course, you’re Ogilvy & Mather. In that case, you tear it down until it’s better than it was.

But before we talk about this agency and the recent rebranding, we need to understand the man who created it; Ogilvy himself.

Who is the “father of advertising” and how did he get there?

David Mackenzie Ogilvy was born in England in 1911. Before he became a worldwide famous advertiser, he had many different professions and career paths. He was a chef, a researcher, a salesman, a farmer and he even worked for MI6 during the WWII.

Regardless of his unusual path, Ogilvy became a pioneer. He showed the advertising world how much of a difference consumer habits research could make.

He defended that consumers are smart and as a result, it’s essential to understand their needs to produce better campaigns. His quote is one of the most famous in the advertising world “The customer is not a moron. She’s your wife”.

This step seems pretty obvious now, but in 1949, using research to support advertising, was something entirely new. Initially, Ogilvy struggled to get clients, but eventually, the Ogilvy & Mather became a worldwide known agency with offices across the globe.

The need for a rebranding

The founding principles haven’t changed since the 50’s, but current times demanded a different image to stay on top.

So this week, it publicly displayed the result of two years of rebranding process with the help of Collins agency. The result is a modernized, newer and unified image, which respects the past but looks forward to the future of advertising.

Their characteristic red color is slightly altered to a shade that is brighter and works for both print and web purposes. Also, the wide recognizable logo evolved into a costume font that still resembles the original signature in some ways. And the complementary colors are bold but not chocking in context.

In times were everyone from Coca-Cola to Spotify are creating new costume fonts and pushing to be personal yet trending, Ogilvy has managed to do it in a very down to earth and classic way, in my opinion.

It’s same to say that some do it better while others do it desperately. Check out the video below to see more of Ogilvy transformation and don’t forget to subscribe for more intel on design and everything related. 😉


Also published on Medium.